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Posts Tagged ‘Sprigg’

#12daysofthinking – the Management School’s contribution

Friday, December 23rd, 2016

In December 2016, the University of Sheffield ran a campaign sharing academic reflections on the most pressing issues facing our society, via Twitter and shef.ac.uk.

Here we share the Management School’s contributions. You can see all of the activity by searching the #12daysofthinking hashtag.

Prof Jim Haslam on The State of our Planet:

12-days-Haslam

Dr Christine Sprigg, Prof Pauline Dibben, Dr Chris Stride and Prof Jason Heyes on The World of Work:

12-days-Sprigg

12-days-Pibben

12-days-Stride

12-days-Heyes

Dr Geoff Nichols on Our Health:

12-days-Nichols

Management School challenges shine at Achieve More

Friday, February 5th, 2016

Cyberbullying-Winners Flooding-Mention

First-year students working on the Achieve More module have seen great success with two Management School-run challenges.

This is the second year that the Faculty of Social Sciences challenge has run, assigning interdisciplinary teams of students from different departments a topic which they then have to find a creative solution to. Over 1,700 students took part.

A team including Dafne Achniotou (Management), Jools Arts (Politics), Lawrence Greco (East Asian Studies), Sanaya Knowle (Economics), Wing Lam Lo (Landscape Architecture), Lewis Manning (Geography) and Patience Nasieku (Law) worked on a topic led by Dr Christine Sprigg from the Management School, with student facilitators Daniella Mokhtar and Gabiela Morales, named ‘How Can the Social Sciences Stop the Cyber Bullies and the Twitter Trolls?’ (pictured above, left).

There were four winners in the challenge overall, and the team clinched the ‘Citizenship’ prize.

Dr Tina McGuinness’s team, run with student facilitators, Kate Orgill and Jie Tang, addressed flood risk and received an honourable mention from the judges. Dr McGuinness, also from the Management School, said: “We were delighted to see how the groups relished the challenge of working across their disciplinary subject boundaries and brought together their different skills to produce stimulating and thought provoking artefacts.

“The facilitators’ involvement was integral to helping all of the student groups to get to grips with the project brief and come up with a range of artefacts which showed their research and creative skills off to best effect.”

Tina’s team (pictured above, right) comprised Georgina Allsopp (Law), Chenhao Cao (Architecture), Eilish Hurst (Journalism), Zhen Jia (Management), Nicholas Sinclair (Economics) and Daniel West (Geography).

Congratulations to both of the teams!

Employees behaving badly – IWP leads the charge

Thursday, November 27th, 2014

On Tuesday 25 November Dr Christine A. Sprigg gave a talk to the Humber Branch of CIPD on ‘Employees Behaving Badly: Is it too costly to ignore?’.

Approximately 50 members of this local branch CIPD battled the fog to attend the talk on Christine’s own previous research on bullying and cyberbullying (the latter with Sam Farley et al), and updated them on recent academic research on why bullying occurs at work and what are the consequences of it for employees and organisations.

Christine was then joined by Lee Whiting, Partner at Bridge McFarland Solicitors, who gave a linked talk on the legal aspects surrounding bullying and harassment at work.

Christine commented: “This was a wonderful opportunity to talk directly to HR professionals from a diverse range of public and private sector organisations about both my own research, and recently published research from others. I enjoy getting out and about, and hearing about the difficult real-world bullying and harassment scenarios that employers and employees have to commonly deal with.”

Culture of cruelty – IWP discuss bullying in HE

Thursday, November 20th, 2014

Two members of the Institute of Work Psychology (IWP), PhD student Sam Farley and Dr Christine Sprigg, have added comment to the recent discussion on the culture of bullying in higher education.

Published on The Guardian online’s Higher Education Network, their article has been widely shared and discussed in academic circles.

Approaching a number of key areas, including ‘what causes bullying’, ‘undermining behaviour’, and ‘how can employees beat bullying?’, the piece not only discusses recent research into the topic, but offers advice to those who may be affected.

Read the article in full here.

Expert discusses falling employment’s effect on mental health

Friday, November 15th, 2013

SpriggDr Christine Sprigg, lecturer and chartered psychologist from the Institute of Work Psychology (IWP) at Sheffield University Management School, was asked to comment on dropping unemployment and its effect on mental health by the British Psychological Society.

Commenting on recent news that unemployment figures are falling, Dr Sprigg (pictured left) said: “In general, the weight of research evidence suggests that in mental health terms at least, it is better to be employed than unemployed. Employment not only provides monetary benefits but vital social and relational experiences – as well as a structure and a meaning to a person’s day. This is not to say you need a ‘paid job’ to garner these health benefits.”

However, research suggests that there is a loophole whereby this is not necessarily the case. Dr Sprigg continued: “Some research has indicated that ‘poor quality’ jobs may not provide the same mental health buffers. So it always important to provide as rich a form of work as possible for people – given the basic constraints of the nature of any job.”

She referenced seminal work by current and previous colleagues at Sheffield, Professor Peter Warr and Professor Paul Jackson.

Read the full story on the British Psychological Society’s website: www.bps.org.uk/news/falling-unemployment-may-boost-health

Management School success at ESRC Festival of Social Science 2012

Thursday, December 13th, 2012

The Festival of Social Science is run by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and took place between the 3rd and 10th of November this year. With events from some of the country’s leading social scientists across the UK the festival celebrated the very best of British social science research and how it influences our social, economic and political lives – both now and in the future. The Management School was pleased to  contribute the following events to the festival this year:

Punched from the screen: Workplace cyberbullying

Dr Christine Sprigg, Dr Carolyn Axtell and Sam Farley of  IWP and Dr Iain Coyne of Nottingham University

This event took place on the 7th of November and was concerned with the findings of the school’s recent study of workplace cyberbullying and its employee impact  in a number of university settings.  The study has consequently received international interest from Canada, India, France, and the US. The event was also the launch of the forthcoming research over the next three years with PhD student Sam Farley, who will be partly working on a work-based measure of cyberbullying. Dr Christine Sprigg said:  “Securing the ESRC funding enabled us to make an international media impact but also find high quality and relevant organizational local collaborators for our research going forwards. We are delighted to have been supported by ESRC in this way.”

ESRC Festival of Social Sciences 2012

Who wants to be an entrepreneur?

Dr Peter Rodgers, Dr Rob Wapshott of the Management School

This interactive workshop took place on the 9th of November at Longley Park Sixth Form College, Sheffield. The event was designed to raise awareness of issues relating to entrepreneurship and enterprise, giving students the opportunity to engage with and develop the skills required to set up and sustain business ventures.

Walking the tightrope: Elite performance in humans

Dr Ute Stephan of  IWP , Dr. Paul Thomas of DNAdefinitive and BBC Business Doctor, Andy McCann of Mental Skills Coach to Elite Athletes, Dr Mark Stacey NHS Anaesthetist, Andy Halliday Team GB Manager Men’s Hockey and Sam Brearey current World Sailing Champion and Steve Eaton, MBE, of the Special Forces

The aim of this event organised by the Management School in association with DNA definitive Wales, was to answer and discuss the following questions:

  • How can we get the best of out of ourselves and show peak performance when it really matters?
  • What is the role of leaders in encouraging high performance – are we perhaps best off getting rid of management altogether?
  • Which lessons can we learn from expert entrepreneurs on how to lead for high performance while creating truly innovative organisations?

The event brought together insights from business leaders, sports professionals, fire arms and medical specialists as well as academics and made for lively discussions with participants hailing from business, professional sports, public health, police and fire services and third sector.

ESRC Festival of Social Sciences 2012

Fuel Poverty related illnesses: a preventable plague

Prof. S.C. Lenny Koh – Director of Centre for Energy, Environment and Sustainability (CEES), University of Sheffield  Management School; Councillor Jack Scott – Cabinet Member, Sheffield City Council; Robert Marchand – Doctoral Researcher at CEES, University of Sheffield Management School; Kath McDaid – Project Development Co-ordinator, National Energy Action (NEA); Prof. Angela Tod – Professor of Health Services Research, Sheffield Hallam University; Kath Horner – Health Improvement Principle, NHS Sheffield; Jo Butcher – Health and Fuel Poverty Advisor, Friends of the Earth.

Attended by 50 delegates ranging from Cabinet Members,  Local Authority figures, Department of Health and  NHS representatives, third sector organisation and university associates, this event took place on the 6th of November in Firth Hall at the University of Sheffield. The event stimulated debate and discussion around the challenges of fuel poverty and how this impacts on health.  The event builds upon the BIG Energy Upgrade project (BEU), which The University of Sheffield is one of 14 partners including 6 Local Authorities, 4 ALMOs, 2 Social Housing Providers and Yorkshire Energy Services, which has received £14.9m funding of which £7m has been provided by the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF). The BEU project targets deprived communities in Yorkshire & Humber and it aims to tackle fuel poverty and at the same time aims to stimulate business development and create job opportunities for those living in the targeted communities.

Coping with Austerity

Professor Jason Heyes University of Sheffield Management School, Dr Kevin Farnsworth from the University of Sheffield Department of Sociological Studies, Alan  Fraser Chief Executive of Birmingham YMCA

Taking place on the 9th of November at the Holy Trinity School in Barnsley, the primary aim of this event was to raise awareness of the consequences and potential consequences of the current government’s austerity measures, particularly in relation to their impact on the life chances and labour market experiences of young people. The event was also intended to demonstrate to the audience the value of social science research.  More than 40 young people between the ages of 16 and 18, including students from Holy Trinity, Sir Thomas Wharton Community College in Doncaster and Thomas Rotherham College in Rotherham attended the event. There were three presentations discussing potential alternative means of dealing with government debt,  the impact of spending and benefits cuts on homelessness,  and whether weaker employment protections are likely to lead to improvements in the employment opportunities available to young people and their ability to access good quality jobs.

ESRC Festival of Social Sciences 2012

Further information:

  • The ESRC Festival of Social Science offers a fascinating insight into some of the country’s leading social science research and how it influences our social, economic and political lives – both now and in the future. This celebration of the social sciences takes place across the UK – via public debates, conferences, workshops, interactive seminars, film screenings, virtual exhibitions and much more. This is the tenth year that ESRC has held the Festival of Social Science and each year the Festival grows from strength to strength.
    Visit: http://www.esrc.ac.uk/
  • The Big Energy Upgrade is a regional flagship project addressing the priority needs of both reduction in carbon emissions and the creation of jobs. To address the issues in an integrated approach the University of Sheffield has brought together a multidisciplinary team of academics working alongside Local Authorities, ALMOs, social housing providers and an energy services company. The Big Energy Upgrade, is delivered by a consortium of local authorities and social housing providers, led by Kirklees Council, is a very ambitious project as, for the first time in the UK, the Partners will work together in adopting a fully integrated, whole-house approach while installing energy efficiency measures and micro generation technologies in households. Through individual household assessments the project will identify a highly individual package of measures for each of the households and which will provide optimal insulation and energy control to the house.
    Visit: www.sheffield.ac.uk/bigenergyupgrade

 

 

 

Cyberbullying in the workplace

Tuesday, November 6th, 2012

Cyberbullying through e-mail, text and web posts is as common in the workplace as conventional bullying but even more difficult to uncover, research by experts from the University of Sheffield has revealed.

Occupational psychologists Dr Christine Sprigg, Dr Carolyn Axtell and Sam Farley of the University of Sheffield, together with Dr Iain Coyne of the University of Nottingham, turned the focus of their investigation onto cyberbullying of adult workers, instead of younger people in schools, for which more research has taken place.

The results of their research will be revealed at a seminar during the Economic and Social Research Council’s (ESRC) annual Festival of Social Science at an event in the Showroom Workstation, Paternoster Row, on Wednesday 7 November 2012 from 5pm until 8pm.

The team will also make suggestions on how employers should tackle and prevent cyberbullying in the workplace. Researchers believe that cyberbullying will become more important as communication technologies continue to evolve and become more widespread.

The study included three separate surveys among employees in several UK universities, asking people about their experiences of cyberbullying in the workplace.

Survey respondents were given a list of what can be classed as bullying, such as being humiliated, ignored or gossiped about, and were asked if they had faced such behaviour online and how often.

Of the 320 people who responded to the survey, around eight out of ten had experienced one of the listed cyberbullying behaviours on at least one occasion in the previous six months.

The results also showed 14 to 20 per cent experienced them at least once a week – a similar rate to conventional bullying. The research team also examined the impact of cyberbullying on workers’ mental strain and wellbeing.

“Our research showed that cyberbullying has a stronger negative impact on employee mental strain and job satisfaction than traditional, face to face bullying does,” said Dr Axtell.

The research team also found that the impact of witnessing cyberbullying was different than that seen for conventional bullying.

“In more traditional, face to face bullying, seeing someone else being bullied also has a negative impact on the wellbeing of the witness,” said Dr. Sprigg. “However, we didn’t find the same negative effect for those who said they had witnessed others being cyberbullied.

“This might be because we are less aware of other people’s reactions online, and so the witnesses might not empathise so much with the victims. This could potentially mean that they are less likely to intervene,” Dr Axtell added.

The results of the research, which was partly funded by Sheffield University Management School, will be presented at a seminar to business representatives. “We believe our research will likely have implications for the way that employers formulate policies and guidelines relating to cyberbullying, and the seminar will be an opportunity for us to discuss our findings and learn about the experiences of other employers,” Dr Coyne said.

Additional information

Festival of Social Science

The Festival of Social Science is run by the Economic and Social Research Council and takes place from 3-10 November 2012. With events from some of the country’s leading social scientists, the Festival celebrates the very best of British social science research and how it influences our social, economic and political lives – both now and in the future.

This year’s Festival of Social Science has over 170 creative and exciting events across the UK to encourage businesses, charities, government agencies, schools and college students to discuss, discover and debate topical social science issues. Press releases detailing some of the varied events are available at the Festival website. You can now follow updates from the Festival on twitter using #esrcfestival.

The University of Sheffield

With nearly 25,000 students from 125 countries, the University of Sheffield is one of the UK’s leading and largest universities. A member of the Russell Group, it has a reputation for world-class teaching and research excellence across a wide range of disciplines. The University of Sheffield has been named University of the Year in the Times Higher Education Awards for its exceptional performance in research, teaching, access and business performance. In addition, the University has won four Queen’s Anniversary Prizes (1998, 2000, 2002, and 2007).

These prestigious awards recognise outstanding contributions by universities and colleges to the United Kingdom’s intellectual, economic, cultural and social life. Sheffield also boasts five Nobel Prize winners among former staff and students and many of its alumni have gone on to hold positions of great responsibility and influence around the world. The University’s research partners and clients include Boeing, Rolls-Royce, Unilever, Boots, AstraZeneca, GSK, ICI, Slazenger, and many more household names, as well as UK and overseas government agencies and charitable foundations.

The University has well-established partnerships with a number of universities and major corporations, both in the UK and abroad. Its partnership with Leeds and York Universities in the White Rose Consortium has a combined research power greater than that of either Oxford or Cambridge.

Contact

For further information please contact:

Paul Mannion
Media Relations Officer
The University of Sheffield
0114 222 9851
p.f.mannion@sheffield.ac.uk

 

ESRC event: Cyberbullying in the workplace

Friday, October 5th, 2012

The Management School is pleased to announce the Institute of Work Psychology has successfully secured funding for an ESRC event as part of the Festival of Social Sciences.

Date: 7 November 2012
Time: 5-8pm
Venue: Showroom 5, Showroom Workstation, 15 Paternoster Row, Sheffield, S1 2BX
To register: Click here to register your free place at the seminar

This seminar forms part of the Economic and Social Research Council’s (ESRC) Festival of Social Science.  Dr Christine Sprigg, Dr Carolyn Axtell and Sam Farley (all at the Institute of Work Psychology (IWP), Management School) and Dr Iain Coyne (at the Institute of Work, Health & Organisations (I-WHO), University of Nottingham), will outline the findings of their recent research in this seminar entitled ‘Punched from the screen: Cyberbullying in the workplace.’

The study, one of the first on workplace cyberbullying in the UK, explores the prevalence, impact and frequency of cyberbullying amongst 320 university staff members.

Who should attend?
This event is aimed at local and national businesses.

Further information:

The Festival of Social Science is run by the Economic and Social Research Council and takes place from 3-10 November 2012. With events from some of the country’s leading social scientists, the Festival celebrates the very best of British social science research and how it influences our social, economic and political lives – both now and in the future. This year’s Festival of Social Science has over 180 creative and exciting events across the UK to encourage businesses, charities, government agencies, schools and college students to discuss, discover and debate topical social science issues. Press releases detailing some of the varied events and a full list of the programme are available at the Festival website. You can now follow updates from the Festival on twitter using #esrcfestival

Tackling cyberbullying in the workplace

Friday, June 22nd, 2012

Dr Christine Sprigg (IWP) with colleagues Dr Carolyn Axtell (IWP) , Dr Iain Coyne (IWHO, Nottingham University) and Sam Farley (incoming IWP GTA PhD Student) have been awarded money from ESRC to organise an event called “Punched from the Screen: The Psychology of Workplace Cyberbullying”. The project builds on the outcomes of Management School Research Stimulation money awarded to the team last year.

Cyberbullying, which uses technology as the media to abuse individuals, is the ‘new kid on the block’ in bullying terms. Cyberbullying is now almost of daily media interest. The event, which will form part of the ESRC Festival of Social Science, later this year will be a participative three hour seminar on cyberbullying in the workplace for 25 business stakeholders. The aim of the event is to discuss this topic with representatives of the business community, to explain what contribution work psychology can make to understanding the phenomena, assessing how it may differ from traditional bullying, and limiting the damage of it to employees. The researchers are also interested in identifying current experiences and practices of dealing with cyberbullying from the participants’ perspectives.

The team’s current research examines cyberbullying from a work psychology perspective, specifically looking at the relationship between cyberbullying and employee wellbeing.  This event is an important forum to showcase the applied nature of work psychologists as social scientists in a relatively new topic area. Current research findings and ideas will be disseminated to participants. However, the researchers are also keen to understand the experiences and viewpoints of the target audience and how this may feed into their future research.

 

Health and Wellbeing at work

Wednesday, March 21st, 2012

Dr Christine. A. Sprigg, lecturer in Occupational Psychology, was invited to give a talk on Wednesday, 7th March at the ‘Health and Wellbeing Christine Spriggat Work 2012′ event at the NEC in Birmingham. The talk, “Psychosocial Risk Factors for Call Centre Employees” was a summary of Christine’s research on call centres which began in 1999 when she was a Senior Psychologist employed by the Health & Safety Executive (HSE).

The Health and Wellbeing at Work event is all about improving the health and wellbeing of work-aged people. The conference and exhibition provides employers with new ideas and resources to ensure employees are fit and healthy, return to work quickly following absence and stay in work. It also looks at pioneering strategies for getting vulnerable people into the workplace and enabling them to fulfil their potential. The event profiles national developments, service innovations, examples of best practice and the latest research, to provide an inspirational learning platform for employers.

Dr Sprigg’s research has investigated stress and job satisfaction within call centres and has fed into various interdisciplinary research projects aimed at improving the working conditions of call centres both in terms of employees’ physical and mental wellbeing. Dr Sprigg commented, “As the call centre sector is such an important source of UK employment, it is vital that this kind of interdisciplinary research continues if we are to positively influence call centre practices”.

The talk was expertly chaired by Professor Peter Buckle, the current president of the Institute of Ergonomics and Human Factors (IEHF). Over 1,000 delegates were registered for each day of this popular practitioner event at the NEC. Christine’s talk will be available online later in the month.