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Archive for the ‘Student’ Category

Representing Sheffield: Jessica reaches finals of Undergraduate of the Year Awards

Friday, May 5th, 2017

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One of our first-year International Business Management students is a UK Management Undergraduate of the Year Award 2017 finalist.

Jessica Lane, the only finalist in the awards representing the University of Sheffield, applied in January and was shortlisted – after a rigorous assessment process she reached the finals, held recently in London.

Jessica said: “I submitted my application after receiving emails about the Undergraduate of the Year awards. After some online tests, I was chosen from 300 applicants for a telephone interview. Forty-five successful candidates then attended an Enterprise Rent-A-Car assessment centre in Surrey which was really tough.”

“I was delighted to be chosen as one of the top ten to attend the finals in Canary Wharf and feel so proud to have represented Sheffield in becoming a UK Management Undergraduate of the Year Award 2017 finalist! I never expected to get as far as I did, and coming away with two summer internships with Enterprise Rent-A-Car was a great conclusion to an incredible experience!”

Other finalists attended from all over the UK, including Aston University, the University of Exeter and Strathclyde.

Programme director for BA International Business Management, Dr Julie Alevizou, said: “I’m so proud of Jessica’s achievement, especially reaching this level of the competition in her first year at Sheffield. The assessment centre had a very practical focus, including tasks such as ‘leading a morning meeting’, and it’s testament to her commitment to studies and natural leadership skills that Jessica progressed to the final stage.”

Click here to read more about the Undergraduate of the Year competition.

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Sheffield women gain insight at IBM

Friday, May 5th, 2017

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In March, four Management School students joined a visit to tech giant IBM’s site in Hursley for a Women in Technology Insight Day.

The trip, shared with students from Sheffield Hallam University, offered participants a great opportunity to learn more about opportunities at IBM – they were able to get a feel for the culture, experience group work activity, get support with their CVs and meet with staff in a wide range of roles in the organisation.

Two BA Business Management students, Israa Abdelrahim and Monika Fekete, were joined by BA Hispanic Studies and Business Management student Anna Rubingh and Mirna Cheet, who studies our MSc Work Psychology.

We asked Israa about her experience:

“The Women in Technology event is organised exclusively for female Sheffield students by two alumni, now IBMers, Waleed and Emma. It was honestly the most valuable experience and opened my eyes to a whole world of technology I had never experienced before.

“On the first day we met some of IBM’s inspiring female employees. They talked about their experiences of working in top positions and each gave refreshing perspectives on how to progress through a career as women. There was a discussion on how IBM provides plenty of opportunities for employees, particularly women, to develop themselves and progress. A common aspect of their jobs they were all passionate about was the flexibility they have.

This gave us an insight as to how IBM employees work. There is a great deal of autonomy and control over their work which is fantastic if you are seeking for a position that allows you to lead and one that recognises your contributions and ideas. What’s more, you do not necessarily have to be a very technical person to work at IBM. For example, I spoke to a chemistry graduate who mentioned that IBM valued her analytical skills from her degree more than her knowledge on technology. Whilst this definitely a relief to know, having a valuable, unique skill is most definitely useful when it comes to finding a graduate job.

“After a chat with the ladies, we were taken on a tour of the campus starting with the ‘Innovative Room’. It had four stations in this room each showcasing different projects developed by IBM. One that stood out to me was the ‘Classifier Content’ software that was developed by IBM Watson – you could enter any baby name into a search box and the software provided a statistic showing what percentage of the name sounded female and what percentage male. The software was also able to ‘classify’ a name of a city to where in the world it is most likely situated. It was particularly fascinating because it was an unusual but original idea and there were some unexpected results.

“After this, we explored the surrounding parkland – if you are the kind of person who likes to take a walk outside during a break, this is the perfect spot.

“We spent the next day participating in a mock assessment centre, one of the stages of the IBM placement or internship application process. This was useful as I was put to the test with other women in my group to figure out the answers to two logical questions using statements given on a paper given to each one of us. What we’d thought was going to be straight forward turned out to be an ordeal and a few minutes in, we realised our own papers actually had different statements so had to scramble together the pieces! Something I learnt to keep in mind for any future assessment centres! In the end, we did manage to find two possible solutions and were given some great tips such as using a logic table when finding the answer.

“IBM does not necessarily look at how much experience you have in technology or coding but rather find any useful skills you may have. They also assess how well you work with other people. There are plenty of opportunities there to progress your career, be flexible with your job and have full control over your work.

“A massive thank you to Waleed and Emma and IBM for organising everything for us. It was a wonderful experience and one that I hope to share with others.”

First and second years – put the Module Choice Fair in your diaries!

Tuesday, April 11th, 2017

From 24-28 April, the Management School is holding a Module Choice Fair in the Courtyard Cafe.

From 2-19 May, the University wants to know which modules you will take next year – between these dates, you’ll be able to select your choices. If you don’t choose in May, you’ll have to wait until autumn when your preferred choices may be full. The University books its rooms in summer, to ensure capacity for students and classes.

If you’d like some extra information to ease the decision making process, come along to the Module Choice Fair in the Courtyard Cafe to chat with module leaders, other students, or programme directors about your options:

Module Choice Fair, April 24-28, SUMS Courtyard Cafe

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Email Jane Mallinson in the SEO with any queries: j.w.mallinson@sheffield.ac.uk

International Business Management students progress through UK competition

Thursday, March 2nd, 2017
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ABOVE (L-R): Margaret Barrionuevo, Kristers Zuika, Meg Seaman, programme director of BA International Business Management Panayiota Alevizou, Dominique Von Oppell and Isaac Bamber Lister

A team of five BA International Business Management students have reached the UK semi-finals of a prestigious international competition.

The Universities Business Challenge (UBC), which runs annually, has educational and employer partners and guides them through three rounds of rigorous testing designed by Learning Dynamics. The Management School’s team, championed by programme director Panayiota Alevizou, stormed through the first round – an online simulation of a real business where they had to make business decisions with regards to the financial data of each trading period, the external business environment, competitor data, and other live factors that any executive board would have to consider.

Competing directly with seven randomly chosen groups from other universities, our team accumulated as much profit as possible after six trading periods, confidently progressing to round two which will be held at the Sheffield’s Octagon Centre on 7 March.

Should they progress to round 3 – the grand final – Margaret, Kristers, Meg, Dom and Isaac will go to compete live against ten other teams at a London venue in an event hosted by UBC’s lead employer partner.

Click here to read more about the competition.

Real-world insight: Our students pitch AECOM entrepreneurship expertise

Friday, December 9th, 2016

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Entrepreneurship is about more than individuals starting businesses – in fact increasingly, big businesses are thinking and working more entrepreneurially.

As a part of our MSc Entrepreneurship and Management, students pitched ideas for entrepreneurship inside an organisation to directors at AECOM, a multinational engineering firm.

The module leader, Dr Chay Brooks, emphasised the importance of working with AECOM on the module, explaining: “Visiting AECOM is a great opportunity for our students and is a part of the learning experience, the contribution of AECOM to the module brings the realities of entrepreneurial activity in a corporate setting to life.”

This semester, students have studied the theory and practice of how big businesses are looking to create environments that encourage employees to be more entrepreneurial, while continuing to deliver their core business. Our collaboration with AECOM gives students a unique opportunity to see how an organisation with over 90,000 employees is changing its working practices to become more innovative and entrepreneurial. As a part of the module students have had guest lecturers by AECOM staff that provide real-world insights, and as a part of their final assessment they presented their recommendations for them to become a more entrepreneurial organisation.

Professor Tim Vorley, Director of the Centre for Regional for Economic and Enterprise Development (CREED), who developed the relationship with AECOM, said: “Taking our students out of the Management School to present their work in a corporate environment is a fantastic opportunity for them, and it is great to see them rising to the challenge as they pitch their ideas.”

The MSc Entrepreneurship and Management provides students with an understanding of entrepreneurship in different countries and contexts, as well as from start-ups to corporate organisation.

In 2017 Sheffield University Management School is hosting the EFMD Entrepreneurship Education Conference, the theme of which focuses on ‘Entrepreneurship inside Organisations’. This area of entrepreneurship education is of growing in interest to business and management schools, and is one in which Sheffield is a leading by example.

Click here to find out more about the conference.

Management School joins ‘Startup Europe Comes to Universities’ initiative

Tuesday, October 4th, 2016

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The number of university graduates willing to start new businesses—the largest producer of private sector jobs over the past 25 years—still depends heavily on the entrepreneurial focus and structure of the institutions from which they graduate.

Years ago, it was rare for a student to have entrepreneurship experience because the cost of starting a business was so high and they didn’t have the resources or expertise to pull it off. Times have changed with ‘Startup Europe comes to Universities (SEC2U)’.

SEC2U is an initiative endorsed by the European Commission (Startup Europe) to create a strong culture of entrepreneurship and innovation within universities across Europe. This consists of a series of events that bring together entrepreneurs, business people and representatives of local governments and universities in order to showcase the available support, share success stories and cases of failure, as well as network. Sheffield University Management School is joining the first edition of SEC2U which will take place from 17 to the 21 of October.

Two free events are taking place at the School, led by Prof Tim Vorley, Dr Robert Wapshott and EU project officer Kate Penney. On Wednesday 19 October there is a two-hour workshop (10am-12pm) for students with an interest in learning the basics of entrepreneurship, business and digital startups, followed on Thursday 20 October by an interactive discussion (Google Hangouts, 10-11am) on international and collaborative partnerships in entrepreneurship education. Click here to book.

This cooperation has been led by STARTIFY7 at the University of Sheffield, a step towards internationalisation also taken by Cambridge University, University Nova of Lisbon and Dublin City University.

This is a time to showcase the work of universities in the entrepreneurship area, build bridges between university communities and startup ecosystems, and facilitate connections.

Take the right step towards your future and don´t miss out on this opportunity. Click here to get your free ticket.

CREED summer school explores migrant entrepreneurship

Tuesday, August 30th, 2016

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Dr Chay Brooks from the Centre for Regional Economic and Enterprise Development (CREED) has been leading the European Entrepreneurship Summer School held at the University of Sheffield’s International Faculty in Greece. The summer school, now in its seventh year, is held in conjunction with our international partners from University of Groningen (Netherlands), High School of Economics (Russia), and the University of Twente (Netherlands).

Dr Brooks said: “It has been amazing week with the students learning about entrepreneurship in the sun! We have had a great range of international speakers sharing insights from their research.”

Across the week students were involved in a series of lectures, workshops and debates in different areas of entrepreneurship. This year the central theme of summer school was the socio-economic impacts of migrant entrepreneurship, which is an important issue in Europe. During the week students had sessions by academics on research including informal entrepreneurship, technology entrepreneurship, corporate entrepreneurship and entrepreneurship and public policy.

Dr Robert Wapshott, who also taught at the summer school, explained: “The aim of the event is to bring together students from across Europe to learn about and debate cutting edge entrepreneurship research.”

During the week students worked in international teams to develop in-depth presentations on some of the big questions facing entrepreneurship research. As the teams explored their topic in depth they sought to unpack the complexities of creating more entrepreneurial individuals, organisations and societies. The team awarded the best presentation included Ann Lozovaia and Alexander Kalita from HSE, Tuong Nguyen from Leipzig and Zhuang Jing from Sheffield, who gave a critical account about the importance of informal entrepreneurship.

Reflecting on her participation in the summer school, Kelly Lawrence, a Sheffield student, said: “The summer school was a fantastic opportunity to meet other students interested in entrepreneurship research. The programme was excellent and we all had a brilliant week.”

The CREED team participating in the summer school this year led by Dr Chay Brooks. It also included Dr Robert Wapshott, Dr Peter Rodgers, Cristian Gherhes and Professor Tim Vorley. Next year the summer school will be held in Moscow and the topic will be on green and sustainable entrepreneurship. If you’re interested in applying to take part, watch this space.

 

 

 

Fantastic employability data for SUMS

Thursday, July 7th, 2016

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New figures released by the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey reflect the Management School’s commitment to building the employability of its undergraduates.

Of our most recent UK graduates, who were the first cohort to benefit from our investment in the dedicated Employability Hub for all three years of their study, 84% are engaged in activities for which their degree is an essential requirement.

A huge 95% have experienced positive outcomes, which relates to graduates in any positive activity six months after graduation.

This year has seen significant gains in the DLHE data for the Management School. On these results, Employability Manager for the Management School, Merryn McGregor, said: “It’s gratifying to see that our efforts and investment are paying off. The past three years has seen a more focused and one-to-one approach to employability for our undergraduates and that’s shown in the DLHE figures.

“In September we introduce a programme for undergraduates called Futures First, developed with members of our Advisory Board,  which will get our students talking about their graduate prospects from day one at the Management School. We can’t wait to see the impact it has on their long-term employability.”

Prof Paul Latreille, Associate Dean for Learning and Teaching at the Management School, said: “Balancing employability priorities our students while maintaining a rigorous research base in learning isn’t easy – but we’ve done it here. Our formula obviously works for business and accounting students and we’ll continue to build on our offer to secure equally competitive scores in the future.”

Postgraduate students place highly at International Graduate Competition

Thursday, June 2nd, 2016

Hear from our four students who came a fantatsic second in the HEC Montreal International Graduate Competition, as well as one of their mentors Professor Tim Vorley:

An insight into policy – a GLOSS delegation visits the ILO in Geneva

Wednesday, May 25th, 2016

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As part of the Senate Award winning GLOSS programme, Prof Jason Heyes and Dr Tom Hastings took a delegation of students to the 326th session of the International Labour Organisation’s (ILO) Governing Body in Geneva, Switzerland.

This fully-funded trip was one of many offered by the programme, which you can read more about here.

Six undergraduates and postgraduates from across the Faculty of Social Sciences joined Jason and Tom on the visit, including Management School MSc student Monisha Khanna who said: “I remember reading an email from the office of the Associate Dean for Learning & Teaching that mentioned this opportunity. It looked really interesting, so I researched the different GLOSS programmes and the Geneva/ILO opportunity stood out for me.

“I am an MSc Occupational Psychology student and the focus of the ILO’s Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) programme mapped back to some of my areas of interest and study. The ILO’s 2016 World Employment and Social Outlook Report also really resonated with me, so I was curious to get first-hand experience about the inner workings of the Governing Body.”

Aware that her interests aligned with those discussed by the ILO, Monisha was successful in her application and left for Geneva with the team in March. She continued: “Being invited to observe the 326th session of the Governing Body was definitely one of the highlights of my Management School experience. The agenda items covered timely global issues such as promoting fair and effective migration policies. It was really interesting to see how the tripartite system of workers, employers and governments worked together in handling complaints and developing policy. We were also privileged to meet with a few ILO officials who were generous enough to give us a private talk about their work.

“Jason and Tom went out of their way to ensure we had a meaningful educational and cultural experience. With the notion of ‘change’ being a constant in the world of work, understanding how the ILO members promote social dialogue on a global scale, was a valuable experience. This is one of the many benefits of attending international meetings and conferences – immersing yourself into new experiences and then sharing what you learned in real time.”

Following the Governing Body meeting, Monisha wrote a briefing which discusses the notions of decent and safe work which tied in with the ILO’s annual World Day for Safety and Health at Work on 28 April. Click here to read it in full.