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Archive for the ‘Learning and Teaching’ Category

Student insight: Studying Operations and Supply Chain Management, a Rolls-Royce sponsored module

Monday, August 14th, 2017

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Hannah McLennaghan, a recent graduate of our BA Business Management with Employment Experience, discusses her experience on our Rolls-Royce sponsored module. First published on our Undergraduate Blog.

“I’ve been looking back over everything I have learnt across my degree and all my best bits. For me, my most challenging yet rewarding module was my second-year Supply Chain Management module. This was a core module at the time and made up of a group project and a written exam at the end of the semester. The most amazing thing about this module was that it was sponsored by Rolls Royce! This meant that senior industry professionals from the company were involved in the creation/ structure of the module content and the assessment. The group project was our way of applying the theories we had learnt throughout the module, to a real life business.

“Our task was simple; generate a 10-year operations and supply chain plan for one of 4 companies in the aviation industry; Rolls-Royce, Pratt and Whitney, Airbus or Boeing. My group chose Pratt and Whitney, a major competitor of Rolls-Royce. Each group member was given a director role within the company: Director of Operational Design, Planning and Control, Enterprise Resource Planning, Manufacturing Operations, Supply Chain Management and my role which was Director of Quality Control and Total Quality Management. Working collaboratively, we analysed the company’s current situation and how the market was operating. Using the theories, we had developed during the lectures, some of which were given by Rolls-Royce executives, we applied it to Pratt and Whitney to generate a plan for their future operations. Although this may sound complicated, it was incredible to take on a task that felt so real! It was also the kind of thing I’ll have to do when I graduate and work for a real company so it was really great practice.

“Our plan was assessed through a written report, and a formal presentation to the module leaders from the University of Sheffield, and senior executives from Rolls-Royce. This was the starting point for me developing my presentation creation and delivery skills which I am now extremely confident in thanks to all the chances I have had to practice during my degree. My group’s hard work finally paid off when we were awarded second place for our 10 year plan out of the entire module! This meant we were presented with the Rolls-Royce Academic Award of Excellence, something that looks INCREDIBLE on my CV, and I have found that employers just love it in interviews. To have my academic work accredited by senior professionals such as Ian Shellard – Director, Global Physical Logistics, Rolls-Royce, is a great talking point that really makes me stand out.

“This is just one example of the way Sheffield University tries to link the theory of management studies to a real industry organisation. It was a strong turning point for me in becoming a more practical learner, which also gave me a greater confidence in my own academic and business operational ability.”

 

Note: After reviewing the programme in 2016, this is now a third year module which involves company visits and applied case work. Click here to read more about it.

Putting words into action – sale of text-to-speech start-up linked to Sheffield MBA director

Thursday, July 20th, 2017

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Dr Vasilis Theoharakis proves that tech start-up deals don’t always happen in Silicon Valley.

As director of the MBA, Vasilis hasn’t only built up an exceptional programme of experiential learning for students – he’s putting the relevant skills and theory into practice. A recent article by leading industry news site TechCrunch covered the sale of text-to-speech start-up Innoetics for whom Vasilis created the advisory board – he also managed part of the negotiation with buyer Samsung.

Innoetics’ product is ideally suited for application on intelligent interfaces, such as Samsung’s Bixby which works much like Siri on Apple products, or across other consumer electronic products and voice-powered services.

After starting his career in tech at IBM, Vasilis is now involved with a number of start-ups and does have links in Silicon Valley. He is a member of the management team at a prominent venture capitalist fund which provides seed money for the sector and passes his knowledge on to Sheffield’s MBA students who frequently interact with businesses and entrepreneurs through modules or the Career Accelerator Programme and Leadership Dinners. He said: “My experiences with companies like Innoetics ensure that I’m still at the sharp-end of business so our MBAs benefit from a realistic, up-to-date view of entrepreneurship and the start-up eco system.

“I make sure that our students put these learned skills into practice through the programme – it’s exciting to see their knowledge and abilities develop in this area via modules such as the New Venture Planning Challenge.”

This project-based core module, delivered in the second semester of the MBA, sees students work in groups to create a business plan and pitch it to a team of investors. Each team is mentored throughout by Vasilis, who guides them on selecting an entrepreneurial idea which leads into a comprehensive, fully-researched plan and presentation.

Vasilis concluded: “Entrepreneurship is one of the three key stands of our MBA programme – alongside leadership and consultancy. It’s a key skill, whether within an organisation or setting up on your own. I’m proud of what our MBAs go on to achieve and that my experience has contributed to their future.”

 

Click here to read more about the Sheffield MBA.

Click here for the full TechCrunch article.

Ongoing growth in graduate employability at SUMS

Friday, July 7th, 2017

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Annual figures from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education have shown further success for Management School graduates.

Of our most recent UK undergraduates to enter the labour market, 87% are engaged in activities for which a degree is essential, a three per cent growth on last year’s results. This figure also demonstrates a 10% jump over three years in this area*.

Merryn McGregor, Employability Manager at the Management School, said: “We’re very satisfied with the 2015/16 results. It’s reflective of our ongoing commitment to building the employability of our students.”

The survey also reports 96% positive outcomes for our students, which relates to graduates in any positive activity six months after graduation.

Associate Dean for Learning and Teaching, Dr Robert Wapshott, said: “These are very encouraging figures, testament to the hard work of Merryn and her team. The School’s Employability Hub goes from strength to strength and its ongoing efforts are mirrored by the success of our graduates in a competitive market.”

Students: Click here to find out more about building your employability at the Management School.

 

* 2013/14 Graduate Prospects figure: 75%

Building employability through learning and teaching: Laura Dean awarded

Thursday, July 6th, 2017

Laura Dean, a university teacher in work psychology at the Management School, has been awarded a university award for Outstanding Practice in Learning and Teaching.

As one of 13 winners at the Faculty of Social Sciences’ Teaching Excellence in Social Sciences (TESS) awards, Laura was commended specifically for building students’ employability through classroom learning.

Nominated by the Management School’s Associate Dean for Learning and Teaching, Dr Robert Wapshott, and Dr Carolyn Axtell, Laura’s work on devising mock assessment centres embedded in the curriculum of two modules.

Laura’s innovation sees MSc Occupational Psychology students design and deliver an assessment centre of the type final year undergraduate students may encounter as part of a job search – it has occupational relevance for the Masters students as many will begin their careers in such roles.

After organising activities, preparing paperwork and taking on administration for the day, they act as assessors for second-year undergraduates taking our module in Career Theory and Practice. The environment is made as realistic as possible so that both groups get to experience the pressure of an assessment centre and identify any things which may impede their performance in a real assessment situation.

Feedback has been very positive. MSc Occupational Psychology graduate (2016) Jack Cousins, currently working at Saville Consulting as a Consultant Analyst, said: “The opportunity to both design and run an assessment centre was crucial in deciding to pursue my current role.”

The undergraduates have the opportunity to practise being assessed and receive feedback on their performance which they find highly beneficial. 84 % said they agreed or strongly agreed this had helped them prepare for selection events, while 98 % agreed they were glad they had opportunity to take part.

As her prize for winning this award, Laura received a certificate and a £500 prize to support future learning and teaching.

Highly commended: How SUMS impressed AACSB

Tuesday, June 6th, 2017

 

L-R: Bob Reid, Executive Vice President and Chief Accreditation Officer from AACSB, with Yvonne Beach, Prof David Oglethorpe and Prof Andrew Simpson from the Management School

Pictured above (L-R): Bob Reid, Executive Vice President and Chief Accreditation Officer from AACSB, with Yvonne Beach, Prof David Oglethorpe and Prof Andrew Simpson from the Management School

From an intensive focus on careers, to impact on organisations and commitment to the mission and vision, Sheffield University Management School has received standout feedback from accrediting body, the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB).

In April, the School announced that it has been awarded another five years of accreditation from AACSB, further to a visit from their peer review team comprising Deans from thee other international business schools. Amongst the formal feedback from AACSB are a number of strengths, innovations, features and practices which they have chosen to commend.

The panel praises the School’s research, employability initiatives and its work with organisations, highlighting how these activities link back to a recognised mission and vision used by the Dean, Prof David Oglethorpe, to embed socially responsible and sustainable practices throughout.

A research-driven environment which impacts on learning and teaching is core to the School, and the University as a whole. AACSB’s panel credited this approach, also noting that toolkits deriving from academic research projects had contributed positively to a variety of organisations, including the International Labour Organisation.

This link with business was also recognised as excellent in the context of Futures First, the School’s student employability initiative which draws on expertise and knowledge from its advisory board members, whose high profile day jobs inform some of the content.

Professor Oglethorpe said: “I’m so incredibly proud of the School, which has once again been granted the full five-year accreditation from AACSB. This is a wonderful result and testament to everything we have all worked very hard towards.

A further five years of AACSB accreditation cements Sheffield’s position as having a top one per cent global business school.

Click here to read our Mission and Vision.

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AACSB were impressed that the School’s mission and vision were embedded throughout the School

Translating Japanese Popular Culture: Successful kick-off event in Kobe

Friday, May 5th, 2017

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Translating Japanese Manga research team, pictured above (front row): Dr Jerzy Kociatkiewicz (left), Prof Ryuta Suzuki, Prof Parker (second from right) and Dr Komori (right) with colleagues from Kobe

In their first joint event, Sheffield University Management School and the Graduate School of Business Administration in Kobe, Japan, held a workshop to discuss Japanese popular culture and management research, with a particular focus on manga.

Dr Naoko Komori and Dr Jerzy Kociatkiewicz from Sheffield hosted the event with Prof Martin Parker from the University of Leicester. He entertained attendees with his talk on critical management studies, which then led to four groups discussing this in the context of Japanese manga – they then presented on their ideas and received feedback.

This international workshop was an excellent start to our research partnership with Kobe University, who also documented the event here and on their Facebook page.

Click here for more information on the workshop.

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First and second years – put the Module Choice Fair in your diaries!

Tuesday, April 11th, 2017

From 24-28 April, the Management School is holding a Module Choice Fair in the Courtyard Cafe.

From 2-19 May, the University wants to know which modules you will take next year – between these dates, you’ll be able to select your choices. If you don’t choose in May, you’ll have to wait until autumn when your preferred choices may be full. The University books its rooms in summer, to ensure capacity for students and classes.

If you’d like some extra information to ease the decision making process, come along to the Module Choice Fair in the Courtyard Cafe to chat with module leaders, other students, or programme directors about your options:

Module Choice Fair, April 24-28, SUMS Courtyard Cafe

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Email Jane Mallinson in the SEO with any queries: j.w.mallinson@sheffield.ac.uk

Cementing our link with Japan: the International Doctoral Programme with Kobe

Thursday, December 22nd, 2016

As 2016 comes to an end, we reflect on a successful year of developing international partnerships with other world-leading schools. For Dr Naoko Komori, a lecturer in accounting, this has seen her achieve her personal academic goal – creating a shared learning space between East and West.

Naoko has been a key player in building a relationship with Kobe University’s Graduate School of Business Administration, with whom Sheffield has launched an innovative International Doctoral Programme (IDP).

The structure of this unique provides an opportunity for PhD students to study at both the host and partner university and benefit from supervision at both – graduating with two PhDs. Dr Komori commented: “This cross-cultural learning experience is an exciting development, for both schools and myself. I am aware that there is too much indigenous knowledge in Japan that remains untranslated in the international academic arena – I hope that the IDP will expand this dialogue.

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The first IDP student, Ruxandra Jianu, said: “I will be exploring the subject of entrepreneurship in Japan. The most exciting aspect is having four world-leading researchers guiding me in my studies – each will have different strengths and experiences, which I think will lead to a unique, cross-cultural PhD thesis. Living and studying in Kobe for a year presents an amazing opportunity to really understand this growing area of research in Japan and the UK.”

Dr Komori has been growing the relationship with Kobe for almost two years, since she was invited to deliver a lecture to young Japanese academics. Following a successful visit with the Dean of Sheffield University Management School at the start of 2016, she is returning in 2017 with Dr Tim Vorley, Associate Dean for Research Impact, to further build the mutual intellectual exchange.

Dr Komori concluded: “The IDP is just the start of this relationship – I’m looking forward to exploring more potential future collaborations.”

Real-world insight: Our students pitch AECOM entrepreneurship expertise

Friday, December 9th, 2016

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Entrepreneurship is about more than individuals starting businesses – in fact increasingly, big businesses are thinking and working more entrepreneurially.

As a part of our MSc Entrepreneurship and Management, students pitched ideas for entrepreneurship inside an organisation to directors at AECOM, a multinational engineering firm.

The module leader, Dr Chay Brooks, emphasised the importance of working with AECOM on the module, explaining: “Visiting AECOM is a great opportunity for our students and is a part of the learning experience, the contribution of AECOM to the module brings the realities of entrepreneurial activity in a corporate setting to life.”

This semester, students have studied the theory and practice of how big businesses are looking to create environments that encourage employees to be more entrepreneurial, while continuing to deliver their core business. Our collaboration with AECOM gives students a unique opportunity to see how an organisation with over 90,000 employees is changing its working practices to become more innovative and entrepreneurial. As a part of the module students have had guest lecturers by AECOM staff that provide real-world insights, and as a part of their final assessment they presented their recommendations for them to become a more entrepreneurial organisation.

Professor Tim Vorley, Director of the Centre for Regional for Economic and Enterprise Development (CREED), who developed the relationship with AECOM, said: “Taking our students out of the Management School to present their work in a corporate environment is a fantastic opportunity for them, and it is great to see them rising to the challenge as they pitch their ideas.”

The MSc Entrepreneurship and Management provides students with an understanding of entrepreneurship in different countries and contexts, as well as from start-ups to corporate organisation.

In 2017 Sheffield University Management School is hosting the EFMD Entrepreneurship Education Conference, the theme of which focuses on ‘Entrepreneurship inside Organisations’. This area of entrepreneurship education is of growing in interest to business and management schools, and is one in which Sheffield is a leading by example.

Click here to find out more about the conference.

Global entrepreneurship education conference comes to the Management School

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2016

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Sheffield University Management School is hosting the 2017 EFMD Entrepreneurship Education Conference, from 8- 10 March 2017.

As home to the Centre for Regional Economic and Enterprise Development (CREED), a team of researchers focused on enterprise and entrepreneurship, whose expertise feeds into our Masters in Entrepreneurship and Management, the School is committed to advancing knowledge through research insights and communicating its work to policymaking and practitioner communities to promote stronger entrepreneurial environments in the UK and internationally.

Director of CREED, Professor Tim Vorley, is leading the event. He said: “Researchers and practitioners in the field of entrepreneurship continue to push the boundaries about what we understand about entrepreneurs and how they operate. This has important implications for entrepreneurship education, both in terms of what leading businesses and management schools teach and how they teach it.

“Entrepreneurship education is no longer characterised by classes on start-up and business plan assessments. Over the past five years the EFMD Entrepreneurship Education Conference has showcased a range of pedagogic approaches and practices at the frontiers of the field. In 2017 the theme of the EFMD conference focuses on ‘Entrepreneurship inside Organisations’ as an area of entrepreneurship and management education that is growing in interest.”

Working closely with businesses and organisations of all sizes, both on our doorstep and globally, is essential to all aspects of Sheffield University Management School; by doing this our research is informed by practitioners, our students benefit from a comprehensive employability programme, and we know we’re teaching cutting-edge material across all courses.

Associate Dean for Learning and Teaching, Dr Robert Wapshott, said: “Students at business schools, from graduates to executives, are increasingly concerned with the question of how to foster entrepreneurship inside organisations, which for academics and entrepreneurship educators leads us to rethink the learning environments we’re developing. Through the conference participants will be encouraged to reflect upon their own professional practice.”

The notion of entrepreneurial practices occurring within organisations is increasingly regarded as a driver of productivity and profitability. During the conference, keynotes, sessions and workshops will explore how companies have come to approach the challenge of becoming more entrepreneurial and what this means for entrepreneurial education and entrepreneurial educators.

Click here to find out more and book your place.