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Archive for the ‘Conference’ Category

Prof Lee’s paper acknowledged by the Academy of Management

Tuesday, August 25th, 2015

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A paper by Professor Bill Lee, Head of the Accounting and Finance division at the Management School, was acknowleged at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management in Vancouver, Canada.

Co-written with Professor Cathy Cassell of Leeds University Business School, the duo’s paper entitled ‘Understanding translation work in the multi-organizational translation of ideas‘, was placed as runner-up for the Carolyn Dexter Award for Best International Paper.

There are only two all-academy annual awards, this being one of them. There were 3,646 accepted papers at the conference this year – each of the 24 divisions put forward their best international paper for consideration. Lee and Cassell’s paper was put forward by the Organizational Development and Change Division.

A Pioneering Academic: Remembering Tony Lowe

Wednesday, June 17th, 2015

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We celebrated the life and contribution of the late Professor Tony Lowe at a series of events on 3 June.

Over 70 attendees came for a day of events at Sheffield University Management School organised by members of the Accounting and Financial Management (AFM) Division and the Centre for Research into Accounting and Finance in Context (CRAFiC).

Head of the AFM Division at Sheffield, Professor Bill Lee, said: “We were delighted to welcome guests from academic and practitioner backgrounds, as well as individuals who knew Tony personally. I was very honoured to welcome many of Tony’s family who helped us during the ceremony to rename the Lowe Lecture Theatre in the Management School.”

“Tony Lowe was the University of Sheffield’s first Professor of Accounting and Financial Management and led The Sheffield School of accounting research, so to see him honoured in the building was very important to us.”

The day began with the Early Career Researcher and PhD workshop and an introductory lecture from Professor Lisa Jack (Portsmouth) discussing social theory and accounting research. The workshop was co-organised with the BAFA Inter-Disciplinary Perspectives SIG and was supported by the Management Control Association. Attendees then split into groups of six to analyse how social theory can be applied to help understand current events. Bill Lee (Sheffield), Doris Merkl-Davies (Bangor), Robin Roslender (Dundee) and Lesley Catchpowle (Greenwich) led these groups.

Following lunch, there was a comprehensive feedback session and discussion on the morning’s events and the naming ceremony. Attendees then filled the Lowe Memorial Lecture Theatre ahead of a panel session discussing the relevance of The Sheffield School today.

Dean of the Management School, Professor David Oglethorpe, and Professor Bill Lee opened proceedings and introduced the panel which was facilitated by Professor John Cullen and comprised Emeritus Professor Richard Laughlin (Kings College, London), Professor Prem Sikka (Essex), Professor Christine Cooper (Strathclyde) and Professor Jane Broadbent (Royal Holloway).

The discussion was broad, but also introduced fascinating insights into Tony’s life and career. While Richard discussed The Sheffield School’s basic principles, Prem touched on how accounting academics can engage the political arena. Meanwhile, Christine profiled the effect of neoliberalism on society and higher education and Jane presented the history of the Management Control Association (MCA), which Tony had helped to found, and the need to revisit The Sheffield School’s original debates. A lively Q&A session followed.

As attendees retired for supper, Dr Stewart Smyth (co-director of CRAFiC) read tributes to Tony which we received from those who couldn’t attend. He concluded: “The day was a fitting tribute to a man who contributed so much to the School, and to the accounting and financial management as a whole. It was an honour to celebrate Tony’s legacy at Sheffield University Management School.”

 

Find out more about CRAFiC
Find out more about The Sheffield School and Prof Anthony Lowe

Forward thinking: Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Regional Development conference comes to Sheffield

Friday, June 12th, 2015

Dr-Nick-Williams

If the Northern Powerhouse is going to come to fruition, locations like the Sheffield City Region need to innovate. With this in mind, the timely arrival of the eighth International Conference for Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Regional Development (ICEIRD2015) in the city next week is certainly appropriate.

The conference which aims to address key factors in fostering entrepreneurship at national and regional level, share good practice in innovation research, facilitate regional partnerships and promote open innovation networks, is being hosted by academic members of the Centre for Regional Economic and Enterprise Development (CREED), a group of researchers at Sheffield University Management School (University of Sheffield).

Conference Chair, Dr Nick Williams (pictured), said: “Sheffield is a city which is changing, moving from traditional industries to a modern, diverse economy. The debates which take place at ICEIRD2015, regarding how city and regional economies can bounce back from crisis and grow again directly reflect the policy debates taking place in Sheffield and elsewhere.

“CREED is a leading research centre producing cutting edge work on entrepreneurship, innovation and regional development. It therefore provides a natural home for the conference, which is being held at the heart of the University of Sheffield campus. We hope our international delegation will enjoy not only the rigorous academic panel sessions, but also the energy of our city and the university itself.”

Keynote speakers include Professor Susan Marlow of the University of Nottingham who will present on ‘searching for the elusive female entrepreneur’, Professor Aard Groen from the University of Twente discussing ‘Entrepreneurial ecosystems’ and Michael Kitson of Cambridge University who opens his dialogue on ‘The role of the university in the innovation ecosystem’.
Sheffield’s world-class conference facilities will play host to ICEIRD2015, which is to be held at INOX, in the University of Sheffield Students’ Union.

Dr Williams continued: “ICEIRD2015 will focus on how entrepreneurship and innovation can help to drive regional and city economies to grow. Much of the focus will be on how the recent economic crisis has presented challenges and how these may be overcome through effective policy.

“Sheffield University Management School is producing leading research on these topics and will contribute to the debates taking place across the two days.”

Find out more about ICEIRD2015 on the website: www.iceird2015.com

Flexicurity: WOERRC event lifts the lid on future directions

Thursday, June 11th, 2015

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Labour Market Security and Flexibility: The Future Directions of Flexicurity in the Age of Austerity, was the title of an event jointly hosted at Sheffield University Management School by the Work, Organisation and Employment Relations Research Centre (WOERRC) and the Academic Association for Contemporary European Studies (UACES)

Delegates enjoyed a day of lively discussion on the subject, covering such areas as the changing political ideology of labour market regulation, the impact of European youth employment policies before and during the crisis and whether flexicurity is a spent concept. Views from speakers were certainly of a European nature, bringing perspectives from Denmark, France, Spain, Greece and Ireland.

The event was attended by a number of scholars, including PhD students, with an interest in the area – speakers included WOERRC members Prof Jason Heyes and Dr Thomas Hastings, as well as Paul Lewis (University of Birmingham), Prof Andrew Gamble (University of Sheffield – pictured above left) and Phil Whyman (University of Central Lancashire), Mikkel Mailand (University of Copenhagen – pictured above middle), Susan Milner (University of Bath – pictured above right), Oscar Molina (UAB) and Orestis Papadopoulos (Keele University).

Dr Hastings said: “The workshop addressed three main questions – firstly, are member states genuinely seeking to achieve flexicurity or will the future of work simply involve ‘less security’ for workers; secondly, what impact have supra- and international institutions had on national labour market policies; and thirdly, does flexicurity need to be re-thought or simply abandoned?

“Attendees readily engaged with the discussions so it was a rigorous but enjoyable workshop, with funding coming from a small event grant by UACES.”

Read more about WOERRC here.

Prof Williams sees European-level successes in tackling undeclared economy

Thursday, June 4th, 2015

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A series of high-profile keynotes means that combating the cash-in-hand economy is now close to the top of the European Commission’s policy agenda.

Following two high-level European conferences in April, held in Bucharest and Dubrovnik, Sheffield University Management School’s Professor Colin Williams has recently presented two further talks at European seminars in Brussels.

On 21 May, a seminar was held for the Directorate-General for Employment, Social Affairs and Inclusion on developing policy towards self-employment. Given the greater likelihood of the self-employed participating in off-the-books work, Prof Williams provided an advisory talk on how the European Commission could join-up its policy on self-employment with its policy on tackling undeclared work.

Later in May, Prof Williams gave a keynote presentation to Copa-Cogeca, the united voice of farmers and agri-cooperatives in the EU, representing 28million farmers. This conference was designed to tackle undeclared work in the agricultural sector and included representatives from the National Farmers Union in the UK, FNSEA in France and their equivalents from 20 other European member states.

The European Parliament is currently engaged in a legislative initiative to establish a European Platform for Combating Undeclared Work which, if approved, will be established by the end of 2015. In 2010, Professor Williams conducted an evaluation of the feasibility and design of this EU Platform for the European Commission.

Out of the shadows: SUMS contributes to high-level conference on combating undeclared work in the EU

Tuesday, May 5th, 2015

Seating Delegates

In Dubrovnik in late April 2015, Deputy Prime Ministers, Cabinet Ministers and senior government officials from 24 European countries met to discuss how they could cooperate to tackle the undeclared economy.

Professor Colin Williams from Sheffield University Management School was invited by the host, Milanka Opacic, Deputy Prime Minister of Croatia, to provide the keynote address on approaches towards tackling undeclared work in the European Union.

The outcome, expressed well by Helena Dalli, Minister of Social Dialogue, Consumer Affairs and Civil Liberties in the Maltese government, was a raised awareness that besides complementing the traditional ‘sticks’ approach that punishes non-compliance with more ‘carrots’ to reward compliance, there was also a need for introducing awareness campaigns on the consequences of undeclared work targeted at enterprises, workers and the general public.

Summarising the view of many countries, Deputy Prime Minister of Bulgaria, Ivaiol Kalfin stated: “Promotion of regulated labour relations between Bulgaria and other EU and non-EU countries is a priority of the government”. The European Commission representative present, Jader Cane, urged governments to make full use of the European Social Fund to undertake coordinated responses.

Professor Colin Williams is currently coordinating a Marie Curie project entitled ‘Out of the shadows: developing capacities and capabilities for tackling undeclared work in Bulgaria, Croatia and FYR Macedonia’, which is seeking to raise understanding among South-East European governments about the need to transcend the ‘sticks’ and ‘carrots’ approach and to tackle it more indirectly by introducing greater awareness amongst citizens of the consequences of undeclared work so that they self-regulate themselves, rather than need to be forced to be compliant through enforcement authorities.

See the website for this project here.

Combating illegal trade and the shadow economy in Europe – SUMS’ Professor Colin Williams paves the way

Tuesday, May 5th, 2015

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Senior tax policy, tax administration and customs officials from 19 Eurasian countries met in Bucharest at the end of April 2015 to learn more about the latest strategies to tackle multibillion-dollar revenue losses stemming from illegal trade, counterfeits, and other aspects of the shadow economy.

Sheffield University Management School’s Professor Colin Williams (pictured above, and with other conference delegates) gave the opening academic overview (PDF) and closing review of policy approaches.

As one of only two academic experts invited, other speakers included senior officials from the U.S. State Department, the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, the World Customs Organization, Interpol and Europol, as well as senior officials from multi-national corporations in the tobacco (JT International, British American Tobacco), alcohol (SABMiller) and pharmaceuticals (Pfizer) industries.

The two-day ‘International Conference on the Shadow Economy and Taxation’ was co-hosted by the International Tax and Investment Center, a non-profit research and education organisation focused on tax reform and public-private initiatives to improve the investment climate in transition economies, and Euromonitor Business Consulting Services.

Professor Williams, along with experienced enforcement officials, concluded the conference by advising that a new approach was essential as we cannot police ourselves out of the current situation, and argued that we need to make it easier and more attractive for people and businesses to move from the shadow to the formal economy.

An international experience – WOERRC introduces students to global leadership in Geneva

Friday, March 27th, 2015

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This week’s International Labour Organisation (ILO) governing body meeting in Geneva had comprehensive representation from Sheffield University Management School’s staff and students.

Working with Global Learning Opportunities in the Social Sciences (GLOSS), Professor Jason Heyes and Dr Thomas Hastings from the Work, Organisation and Employment Relations Research Centre (WOERRC) at the Management School have taken a group of Management and Politics students to the event.

Prof Heyes explained: “The ILO is a United Nations organisation that is responsible for developing and promoting international labour standards and helping its 185 member countries to promote decent work. It is governed on a tripartite basis by governments, employer bodies and trade unions from its member countries. Its governing body meeting develops policy recommendations that are then discussed and ratified at the International Labour Conference.

“As Director of WOERRC, I have a longstanding relationship with the ILO. The students have listened to debates regarding the global challenges facing the ILO, freedom of association, legal issues and international development. Thanks to my connection with the ILO, and the efforts of Sian Parkinson from GLOSS, they have met with ILO officials to discuss social dialogue, migration and employment and have also met an ILO intern – Aaron Booth – who is a former MSc Human Resource Management student from the Management School, recommended to the ILO by myself.

“The students will write a number of policy briefs on issues discussed during the trip. These will be disseminated via WOERRC and GLOSS and will also be highlighted at an event in Westminster on 15 June, which will be attended by PVC of the Faculty of Social Sciences Professor Gill Valentine and to which officials from the ILO and relevant UK organisations will be invited.”

The opportunity to attend this year’s governing body meeting was advertised to final-year BA Business Management and International Business Management students, as well as those on the MSc Human Resource Management and MSc International Business programmes. Prof Heyes and his team selected BA Business Management & Economics student Dean Broomhead as an attendee on the basis of a strong application which highlighted his interest in the ILO and his knowledge of its remit and activities.

We asked Dean what encouraged him to apply for the trip: “Primarily, my motivation behind applying was the fact that this was an incredible, unique opportunity. To have such an experience I believed would not only enhance my wider knowledge but also increase my employability.

“There hasn’t been a single ‘typical’ day at the event. We’ve had the flexibility to tailor our time to areas that we found interesting. Over the course of the trip, I’ve sat in on governing body meetings discussing a vast array of issues and had the opportunity to speak to ILO employees on their fields of expertise. We’ve also visited several other United Nations buildings. Two particular stand-out moments would be visiting ‘the palace of nations’ (the UN headquarters) as it was great to see the history and importance of such a place, and secondly sitting in on the governing body meetings of the ILO, with regards to accusations and breaking of conventions. I was able to see true diplomacy in action on several controversial and topical issues.

“I can certainly relate much of what I’ve learnt back to my degree. Whilst the wider awareness and experience is obviously fantastic, I now have a greater understanding of many topics that I can specifically convey in to my work at University. With relation to career prospects, I am certain this will help me. Not only have I had the chance to grow my network, but also the opportunity to develop many transferable skills.”

Dean found out about the opportunity through his Industrial Relations module, but there was plenty of email correspondence and promotion around the School – he encourages his peers to pay attention to such opportunities: “Whilst sometimes they can be on barely noticeable emails, there are opportunities do things like this through the Management School and I haven’t regretted any moment here. I’m a firm believer in saying yes to any opportunities like this. I doubt many students in the UK or even globally have had the chance to work in agencies of the United Nations and brush shoulders with diplomats and specialists alike.”

The ILO is an international organisation and this has been a fantastic opportunity for students to learn about the work, employment and employment relations challenges facing different countries around the world and to gain a better understanding of how policies are developed and implemented. Keep an eye out for similar opportunities through GLOSS and WOERRC.

http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/gloss

http://www.woerrc.group.shef.ac.uk/

Employees behaving badly – IWP leads the charge

Thursday, November 27th, 2014

On Tuesday 25 November Dr Christine A. Sprigg gave a talk to the Humber Branch of CIPD on ‘Employees Behaving Badly: Is it too costly to ignore?’.

Approximately 50 members of this local branch CIPD battled the fog to attend the talk on Christine’s own previous research on bullying and cyberbullying (the latter with Sam Farley et al), and updated them on recent academic research on why bullying occurs at work and what are the consequences of it for employees and organisations.

Christine was then joined by Lee Whiting, Partner at Bridge McFarland Solicitors, who gave a linked talk on the legal aspects surrounding bullying and harassment at work.

Christine commented: “This was a wonderful opportunity to talk directly to HR professionals from a diverse range of public and private sector organisations about both my own research, and recently published research from others. I enjoy getting out and about, and hearing about the difficult real-world bullying and harassment scenarios that employers and employees have to commonly deal with.”

Teaching champions recognised internationally

Friday, October 24th, 2014

Andrea Ward, Director of Teaching Quality and Enhancement (Postgraduate) at Sheffield University Management School, has been awarded a prestigious US fellowship.

The Jane N Ryland Fellowship is offered by EDUCAUSE, an American organisation which helps those who lead, manage, and use information technology to shape strategic IT decisions at every level within higher education.

The grant Andrea receives through receiving the fellowship allows her to attend the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI) Annual Meeting in February. Held in Anaheim, California, this event will enhance work that Andrea is doing on introducing technology-based learning and teaching in the Management School.

Associate Dean for Learning and Teaching, Professor Paul Latreille, said: “This is an exceptional professional development opportunity for Andrea, and I’m delighted that one of our key learning and teaching staff has been acknowledged with this honour.

“The Jane N Ryland Fellowship is highly competitive, and Andrea becomes one of a very small number of non-US recipients, and to my knowledge only the third from the UK. She has been recognised as a trailblazer in our sector, with the EDUCAUSE Fellowship Advisory Committee giving special mention to the well-focused, practical commitment reflected in Andrea’s application.”

Another ambassador for learning and teaching at the Management School, teaching champion for the Accounting and Financial Management Division, Jonathan Jeffery, has also been recognised in the form of an entry in a forthcoming Higher Education Academy (HEA) compendium.

Jonathan’s contribution showcases an excellent and innovative pedagogical approach in relation to independent learning, centred around an innovative tutorial format involving a mixture of whole group and tailored individual activities contributing to the creation of an overall understanding. Among its novel features the module includes formative in-class support, the use of Google Drive, Google Hangouts and Skype, and of peer review software.

Head of the Accounting and Financial Management Division, Professor Bill Lee, said: “The division, and wider Management School community, passes on its congratulations to Jonathan. His inclusion in this compendium demonstrates the importance of the high quality learning and teaching offered at Sheffield alongside our world-class research.”