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Working to reduce food waste in developing countries

January 18th, 2019

Scientists and engineers in the UK are working to use ideas from advanced space technology to improve the lives of farmers and reduce food waste in developing countries. 

Due to a warmer climate and a lack of technology, expertise and infrastructure, up to 40% of food in developing countries can be wasted, with much of this waste being fresh produce. This is because the farmers are unable to insulate and cool or refrigerate produce after it is harvested – and on the journey between the farm and the consumer, the food can become spoiled.

A research team, led by Dr Sonal Choudhary of the University of Sheffield, is working on utilising the Science and Technology Facilities Council’s (STFC) expertise in space science and cryogenics, thermal engineering and analysing large datasets to improve the efficiency of the cold food supply chain in India and so reduce the amount of waste, both in terms of food and energy. The project is being undertaken as part of STFC’s Food Network+ research programme.

UK expertise in cryogenics, the science of extremely cold temperatures, and of thermal engineering could hold the key to bolstering the food chain by reducing the amount of loss from farm-to-fork and by doing so, helping farmers raise their income.

Dr Choudhary said: “There are a number of practical and logistical challenges for farmers in developing countries. Once they have harvested the fruit or vegetables, how can they keep it fresh before it reaches the consumer? They are often unable to afford refrigerated vehicles, and rely solely on traditional methods such as transporting the produce through open trucks, rickshaws, motorcycles and even bicycles. Given the ambient temperature of 40-45oC in many parts of India, a good thermal insulation along with cryogenics technology could provide us with a viable option to reduce food loss from farm-to-fork and improve the cold chain efficiency.”

Dr Bryan Shaughnessy is head of the Thermal Engineering Group at STFC RAL Space and also a participant in this project. “We design systems to withstand the harsh extremes of temperature in space. By taking the technology and expertise we apply in developing instruments for use in space missions and instead looking at how to apply it in assisting in keeping food cooler in warm climates I believe we have an opportunity here to find fairly low cost solutions to what can be a very expensive problem…”

Dr Choudhary added: “Thanks to the STFC Food Network+ we have the chance to work with experts in cryogenics, thermal engineering and data science, alongside stakeholders from the supply chain to really iron out some of the logistical challenges and get one step closer to making this solution a reality.”

The project has been funded by the STFC Food Network+, which brings together researchers from STFC and different disciplines in the agri-food sector with the aim of solving some of the world’s greatest food sustainability challenges.

The team have utilised participatory workshops and focus groups to predict any challenges in implementing STFC space science and technologies in India, where the gaps in the infrastructure exist, and what interventions are needed at different stages of the food supply chain from farmers to retailers and end consumers.

“We have met with farmers, retailers, academics, government officials and other invested parties to try to really understand the issues the sector faces and to come up with ways to meet those challenges. Early studies have shown that it is certainly possible to increase farmers’ livelihood by decreasing food loss from farm-to-fork,” Dr Choudhary said, “Now we need to demonstrate how this could be achieved at a low budget utilising STFC space science and technologies.”

The team is made up of both academia and industry, with representatives from the Sheffield University Management School (SUMS), Hull University Business School (HUBS), STFC’s RAL Space and commercial cryogenics firm Cryox.

University of Sheffield to lead €4 million research project exploring a more sustainable future

January 10th, 2019
ReTraCE: Realising the Transition towards the Circular Economy

ReTraCE: Realising the Transition towards the Circular Economy

The University of Sheffield will lead a €4 million research project and train a new cohort of thought leaders to drive the transition towards a more sustainable mode of production and consumption in Europe over the coming decades.

Realising the Transition to the Circular Economy (ReTraCE) is a research project funded by Horizon 2020 EU’s Marie Skłodowska-Curie Innovative Training Networks and will support the implementation of the European Commission’s Circular Economy strategy.

A circular economy is an alternative to a traditional linear economy (make, use, dispose) in which we keep resources for as long as possible, extract the maximum value from them whilst in use, then recover and regenerate products and materials at the end of their useful life.

The project will bring together world-leading experts from a wide set of beneficiaries and partners to achieve breakthroughs in understanding how the transition towards a circular economy can be realised – both within existing organisations and industries as well as through innovative and sustainable business models.

Professor Andrea Genovese, from the University of Sheffield’s Management School and Principal Investigator of the ReTraCE initiative, said:

“This project will directly facilitate the implementation of the recently adopted ambitious Circular Economy strategy of the European Commission, which is closely linked to Sustainable Development Goals – the blueprint to achieve a better and more sustainable future for all.

Looking beyond the current take-make-dispose extractive industrial model, a circular economy is an alternative to a traditional linear economy. It aims to redefine growth, focusing on positive society-wide benefits, where products are kept in use for as long as possible, with value recovery and regeneration at the end of their useful life.”

The consortium of ten beneficiaries is led by the University of Sheffield and includes seven academic and three non-academic groups: The University of Kassel (Germany), Parthenope University of Naples (Italy), Olympia Electronics S.A (Greece), Tata Steel (UK), University of Kent (UK), ABIS – Academy of Business in Society (Belgium), Dalarna University (Sweden), Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University (Netherlands), and SEERC – The South-East European Research Centre (Greece).

The network will design and deliver world-class multidisciplinary training to 15 early stage researchers, offering them an extended and valuable program of international exchanges and secondments through a wide network of partner organisations – from public, private and third sector.

The multi-disciplinary project will draw upon research that will advance the current understanding of the circular economy from economic, environmental and social perspectives, providing policy insights and implications for practice.

It is envisaged that, by the end of the project, early stage researchers will be employable by research institutions, public sector bodies and within a wide range of manufacturing and service industries which will require new professional profiles for realising the transition towards the circular economy.

Call for applications

The project has a call for applications for 15 Early Stage Researcher positions funded by the EU H2020-MSCA-ITN-2018 scheme. Find out more about the project on their Twitter and Facebook pages.

 

Government-commissioned research led by University of Sheffield will help law and accountancy firms adopt new technologies

November 29th, 2018

  • Research project will help mid-sized law and accountancy firms adopt artificial intelligence and machine learning technologies – helping to improve the productivity and prosperity of cities and regions across the UK
  • Sheffield University Management School-led project is one of three successful bids to the Industrial Strategy Challenges Fund Next Generation Services call

A major new research project led by the University of Sheffield will help mid-sized law and accountancy firms adopt artificial intelligence and machine learning technologies to improve productivity.

A team of researchers, led by Professor Tim Vorley from the University of Sheffield’s Management School, is one of three successful bids to the Industrial Strategy Challenges Fund (ISCF) Next Generation Services call.

The research, commissioned by the UK government, will focus on helping people adopt new technologies.
Professor Vorley will lead a team of colleagues from the University of Sheffield; Lancaster University; Manchester Business School; The University of the Arts, London; as well as non-academic partners the Managing Partners’ Forum and Normann Partners.

The project, Innovating Next Generation Services through Collaborative Design, will focus on firms that are cautious or uncertain over how to implement technological change.

Rather than focusing solely on new technologies, the research will involve exploratory prototyping of solutions designed in collaboration with firms to enable a rapid generation and assessment of potential future applications of artificial intelligence across businesses. This is critical if adoption within sector firms is to be broadened.

The services sector accounts for almost 80 per cent of the UK economy, with professional services the largest sub-sector representing 11 per cent of GDP.

Professor Vorley said: “Understanding the transformative potential of AI involves looking at individual firms, the outcomes provided to clients, and the business processes and predictions that are deployed.

“Our project will focus on understanding the technological and behavioural barriers facing mid-sized legal and accountancy firms, and suggesting potential solutions, as this is the segment where intervention will have maximum impact on the continued success of the overall sector.”

Dr Chay Brooks, a co-investigator at Sheffield University Management School, added: “The adoption of AI will have a transformative impact on professional service businesses. Given the emphasis in the Industrial Strategy on the place agenda, our work focusing on mid-tier legal and accountancy firms is important for the productivity and prosperity of cities and regions across the UK.”

Richard Chapin, a co-investigator from the Managing Partners’ Forum. said: “The potential of AI remains hypothetical unless and until the leadership team at a firm has the authority, confidence and knowledge to persuade frontline advisers to embrace new ways of working. ‘Command & control’ is seldom a viable route to bring about change at a professional firm.”

Business Secretary, the Rt Hon Greg Clark MP, said: “The UK is the home of AI – from Alan Turing’s pioneering work to today’s growing use of AI throughout the economy. Artificial Intelligence is changing how we work, live and play.

“Through our modern Industrial Strategy, we want to build on our history of innovation to develop and deploy AI to create new opportunities and improve services across the whole economy.”

Read the rest of this entry »

Professor Colin Williams invited to discuss proposed European Labour Authority in the European Parliament

June 12th, 2018

Dr Colin Williams European Parliament

Brexit negotiations may be the only news for the UK in relation to the European Union, but it is very much business as usual in the European Parliament. Colin Williams, Professor of Public Policy in Sheffield University Management School (SUMS), was invited on 6th June to discuss the proposal for a European Labour Authority in the European Parliament.

The European Labour Authority aims to ensure that EU rules on labour mobility are enforced in fair, simple and effective way. It was announced in September 2017 by the president of the European Commission and on 13 March, the legislative proposal was presented as part of the roll-out of the European Pillar of Social Rights. It is proposed that the Authority will be up and running in 2019 and is expected to reach its full operational capacity by 2023.

Invited by the Progressive Alliance of Socialists and Democrats in the European Parliament (S&D Group), the second largest grouping of MEPs in the Parliament, Professor Williams made the case for a real and effective European Labour Authority able to enforce labour and social rights and ensure rules on labour mobility fairly. Drawing upon his experiences as lead expert to the European Commission’s European Platform Tackling Undeclared Work, he called for a greater focus in the legislative proposal upon developing the capabilities and capacities of Member States to tackle labour abuse and enforce workers’ rights. He also called for a shift away from solely dealing with labour abuses after they occurred and towards preventing them from happening in the first place.

Professor Williams shared the platform with the Confederal Secretary of the European Trade Unions Confederation (representing 45 million members), and the European Commission official responsible for the legislative proposal. The debate was live-streamed and interpreted in five languages.

For further information: http://www.socialistsanddemocrats.eu/newsroom/sds-we-need-effective-european-labour-authority-protects-workers-rights-and-ensures-fair

Language and translation in international management research

June 11th, 2018

 

  • Symposium announcement:
    Dr Huiping Xian, Lecturer in Human Resources Management and Organisational Behaviour at Sheffield University Management, is organising a symposium on language and translation at the European Academy of Management Conference 2018


Increasingly, research projects are located across the globe and therefore situated in countries, regions and institutions which are culturally, socially, politically and linguistically diverse.  Researchers collect empirical data that is frequently expressed in local languages. Yet at the crucial moment of dissemination of knowledge and in particular at the publication stage, English is often recognised as the only legitimate language, as if it captures the experience of all ‘others’.

The symposium is located in a field of inquiry, which concerns itself with the role of languages and translation in international business/management research. Currently, this research stream focuses on the existence of language diversity at international workplaces. The symposium takes the ideas emanating from this body of work forward by asking more specific questions about the role of translation as a concomitant aspect of language diversity. Questions which will be addressed pertain to designing, conducting, reporting and disseminating international research. These include aspects relating to philosophical-ontological questions, the empirical research process, and the role of English in the publication world.

Panelists with expertise in international research will share their experience and explore theoretical, methodological and practical issues in both quantitative and qualitative research. Three broad themes will be explored:

  • Publish or perish – in English: This contribution explores implicit, unacknowledged assumptions about the publication of research accounts written in English in order to achieve the status of legitimate, recognisable and valid knowledge. This assumption is supported by references to journal ranking lists, which provide an institutionally sanctioned tool to categorise the value of published knowledge. This theme focuses on the ‘consequences of knowledge’ and provides practical ideas about how to challenge this English language dominance without endangering its power as a bridging language to capture empirical and conceptual diversity through translation.
  • Translation in empirical projects: This theme explores crucial issues in the translation process, such as who translates, what and how, how to report this into written research accounts, what gets left out, or added on in the translation process, what gets created? In the symposium, we will discuss protocols how to report such data in written research account.
  • Translation of bodies of knowledge: This theme focuses on the dissemination of knowledge to a multilingual audience. Western bodies of knowledge serving as a guiding conceptual framework in ‘other’ contexts have been considered as standard practice in international research. We will explore different ways of developing indigenous research/knowledge. Issues of training next generation of international researchers will also be discussed.

This workshop will be of interest to researchers and doctoral candidates undertaking research in a language other than English, and to academics, who are native English speakers but working in multi-cultural and multi-lingual projects.

 

Symposium Title: Multilingual research, monolingual publication: Language & translation in international management research

Organiser: Dr Huiping Xian, University of Sheffield

Time: 21st June, 14:00-15:30

Venue: Arnagardar Building A201, University of Iceland

Chair: Professor Susanne Tietze, Sheffield Hallam University

Discussants:

  • Professor Bill Lee, University of Sheffield
  • Dr Huiping Xian, University of Sheffield
  • Dr Philippe Lecomte, Toulouse Business Schoool
  • Dr Nan Jiang, University of Westminster
  • Dr Outila Virpi, Aalto University
  • Dr Natalie Wilmot, Sheffield Hallam University

Blockchain could bridge the gap to integrated transport, according to new report

June 7th, 2018
  • Sheffield University Management School and Transport Systems Catapult (TSC) report studies the disruptive potential of Blockchain in the transport industry
  • Professor Lenny Koh, Director of the Advanced Resource Efficiency Centre (AREC) at Sheffield University Management School, co-authored the report with Charles Carter, TSC.
  • TSC is calling for government and industry to explore the technology’s potential uses in transport to ensure the UK stays ahead of latest developments

Blockchain

Blockchain could provide the underpinnings for a future integrated transport system, without the need for large and costly centralised control mechanisms, according to a new paper from Sheffield University Management School and the Transport Systems Catapult (TSC).

The TSC is calling for government and industry to explore the technology’s potential uses in transport to ensure the UK stays ahead of latest developments.

Blockchain is a Distributed Ledger Technology, which is a special type of distributed database. Each computer ‘node’ or member in a network  stores an identical ‘ledger’ or database. This database takes the form of a chronological chain of unique groups  of information called ‘blocks’ which are securely linked together using cryptography.

The University of Sheffield and TSC report found that, whilst currently the technology is still some years from full maturity, synergies exist in areas like freight and logistics, autonomous vehicles and mobility as a service, where the technology could be applied in the future.

This is because these areas will involve multiple businesses with potentially competing interests, who require trust and transparency to share data and work together seamlessly – which plays to the strengths of Blockchain.

In one example, the report highlights that the decentralised nature of Blockchain could provide an alternative future for mobility as a service business model, where transport is supplied on demand to subscription customers.

Blockchain could help avoid the situation where centralised platforms come to control service provision and data leading to minimal competition. Instead it could facilitate a decentralised network of transport operators by providing built-in trust, consensus and immutability in data and information sharing. Passengers could also have greater control over their personal data.

The report also suggests that Blockchain could also help integrate autonomous drone fleets into the existing transport network, without the need to establish large regulatory organisations to track and monitor use and licensing.

Professor Lenny Koh, Director of Advanced Resource Efficiency Centre (AREC), at Sheffield University Management School, added: “Our transport systems and their wider networks and supply chains are increasingly digitalised. The traditional ways of managing transactions and resources in order to provide frictionless processes, mobility, products and services to users are no longer efficient. In this partnership between the Transport Systems Catapult and the University of Sheffield, we have explored the potential of Blockchain to address these challenges.

“Blockchain as a disruptive technology, to be used in conjunction with Internet of Things and Artificial Intelligence in the Cloud, can add further value and have a transformational impact on transport including the acceleration of the Machine-to-Machine (M2M) economy.”

Discussing the report, TSC Chief Technology Officer Mark Westwood added: “The TSC’s unique neutral and trusted position allows us to provide a balanced voice against the positive and negative messages around Blockchain through this report. We need to help decision makers understand the potential benefits and limitations of Blockchain technology. It is also important to analyse potential use cases to find out if Blockchain is a good fit, or if other technologies could provide a better solution.

“Blockchain is still a new technology, but it has the potential to disrupt parts of the transport industry in a similar way as it has in finance. Other countries and businesses are exploring its potential right now. The technology’s disruptive potential is such that the UK transport industry needs to start paying attention, so we are not caught out later.”

The TSC is calling for the government’s Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund to support future mobility through the launch of a dedicated R&D programme, collaborating with the transport services industry to build demonstrators of new mobility services. This will enable new service models and technologies such as Blockchain to be tested in-market, creating economic growth for UK based companies through reducing time to market.

Download the full report ‘Blockchain Disruption in Transport: Are you decentralised yet?’

Providing advice to the West Balkans 6 on EU accession

June 4th, 2018
  • Professor Colin Williams of Sheffield University Management School has been appointed to advise six countries in the West Balkans on their accession to the European Union from 2025. 
  • Prof Williams will provide advice on the development of strategies for tackling undeclared work in six countries; Albania, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Kosovo, FYR Macedonia, Montenegro, and Serbia.  

Brexit may be the hot news in the UK but other countries in Europe recognise the advantages of EU membership and are actively seeking to join the EU family. Colin Williams, Professor of Public Policy at Sheffield University Management School, has been appointed to advise six countries in the West Balkans on their accession to the European Union from 2025.

The appointment of Prof Williams follows a keynote speech he delivered at the first European Commission conference in the West Balkans region in January 2018, on the subject of boosting the social dimension.  

Working with the Regional Cooperation Council, the objective of Professor Williams is to align the strategies towards tackling informal employment in these six countries with the approaches being adopted in the European Union. If achieved this will facilitate their smooth accession, by demonstrating how they are already adopting the good practices being pursued in the EU member states.

Professor Williams will provide advice on the development of strategies for tackling undeclared work in the six countries. As Professor Williams comments, “cash-in-hand or undeclared work is the equivalent of some 25-35% of GDP in these countries, and effective strategies need to be put in place to smooth the accession process into the EU”.

Following an initial diagnostic report and the production of a roadmap for each country, the second and much more arduous stage will entail seeking ‘buy-in’ from the governments and social partners in each country.

This project follows a raft of previous work in the region:

  • In 2010, Prof Williams undertook a similar exercise prior to the entrance of Croatia into the EU.
  • In 2016, Prof Williams successfully negotiated one of the four ‘bailout conditions’ with Greece, helping them develop a strategy to tackle their large undeclared economy.
  • From 2013-2017 Prof Williams was Principal Investigator on a £1.2 million Marie Curie Industry-Academia Partnerships Programme grant to develop the capacity and capability for tackling undeclared work in the region.   

Innovation in the professional services sector

May 22nd, 2018
  • A new report from Sheffield University Management School explores innovation and technological change in the professional services sector.
  • The report finds that data and external factors are key drivers for innovation, whilst organisational cultures, cost, capacity and risk are common barriers.
  • Firms must become more open and receptive to innovation to sustain the UK’s position as a global leader in the professional services sector.

 

A report on innovation in business and professional services firms has been published today, led by colleagues at Sheffield University Management School in conjunction with BPS Birmingham. The research, funded by the National Productivity Investment Fund through the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), explores opportunities for technological change, including AI and Machine Learning, as well as the challenges they present.

The legal and accountancy sector have historically both under-invested and under-utilised technology, and so there is considerable scope for transformational change. The scoping study highlights a series of organisational and cultural barriers to the adoption and diffusion of innovation.

 

The findings from 34 in-depth semi-structured interviews with senior partners and/or innovation officers in mid-tier and large legal and accountancy firms highlight 5 key issues:

  1. That external factors were found to have a significant influence on the attitudes of firms towards innovation, and in many instances the incentives to innovate were client-led or to ensure regulatory compliance.
  2. The power of data should not be overlooked. Data is likely to become a more significant source of future competitive advantage, as well as a driver for innovation.
  3. The dominant firm structures and organisational cultures of accountancy and legal firms were found to present barriers to the adoption and diffusion of innovation.
  4. The nature of innovation will have different impacts on the sector. Some innovations will enhance the business offer, while other innovations threaten to cannibalise the core business.
  5. Cost, capacity and risk were consistently identified as barriers to the adoption and diffusion of technological and organisational innovation.

The prominence of ‘Next Generation Service’ as the focus of one of the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund (ISCF) is testament to the importance with which the Government views the business and professional services sector. The aim of the ISCF is to enable researchers and businesses to work together to identify and develop new ways to create value as well as stimulate productivity and growth.

The report concludes that if UK is to sustain its position as a global leader in the professional services sector, firms need to become more open and receptive to the adoption and diffusion of innovation. Many legal and accounting firms have established business models, with innovations typically incremental and slow to be adopted. Whilst artificial intelligence and machine learning are only in their infancy, their potentially transformative power can be seen already and are firmly on the horizon.

The lead author of the research, Dr Chay Brooks, commented that “The findings highlight the need to challenge established norms in many legal and accounting firms which are slow to innovate and change. These established norms pose a threat to future competitiveness and growth.”

Executive Director of BPS Birmingham, Hilary Allen, explained “Given that services account for 80% of the economy, it is right that they increasingly form the focus of research and policy”. She also highlighted that “More than ever, the sector needs to think beyond business as usual and challenge the status quo if its leading position is to be maintained.”

Associate Dean for Engagement, Impact and Innovation at Sheffield University Management School and co-author of the report, Professor Tim Vorley commented “This scoping study highlights the importance of working with the sector to understand the issue faced, and is the first step in addressing them. Through our work with BPS Birmingham we are laying the foundations for a UK-wide study that aims to identify overcome the barriers identified in this study”.

For more information on this scoping study or to get involved with future research associate with innovation in the professional services sector please contact Dr Chay Brooks (c.brooks@sheffield.ac.uk) or Prof Tim Vorley (tim.vorley@sheffield.ac.uk)

 

Read the full report here.

Implementing Sustainable Development Goal #8 in the Republic of Azerbaijan

May 21st, 2018

 

  • Professor Colin Williams has been appointed as Advisor to the government of the Republic of Azerbaijan to implement Sustainable Development Goal 8 (SDG8)
  • On 21 May, Williams presented his preliminary findings to a conference in Azerbaijan hosted by the Deputy Prime Minister
  • SDG8 promotes sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, productive employment, and decent work for all

 

Colin Williams, Professor of Public Policy at Sheffield University Management School, has been appointed as Advisor to the government of the Republic of Azerbaijan. He will be overseeing the implementation of Sustainable Development Goal 8 (SDG8).

The United Nations organisation responsible for SDG8 – the International Labour Organisation (ILO), has appointed Williams to oversee its successful implementation in the Republic of Azerbaijan. SDG8 seeks to promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, productive employment, and decent work for all.

Drawing upon his expertise in supporting the transition from the informal to the formal economy, Williams is working closely with the Ministry of Labour and Social Protection as well as the Ministry of Economy and Ministry of Taxes.

Professor Williams states “I am keen to implement a holistic approach towards creating decent work, by formalising the informal economy. I developed this strategy in the context of the European Union. This pursues a strategic, integrated and coordinated approach based on the full range of measures available”.

Suggested initiatives include:

  • designing and implementing deterrents to working in the informal economy
  • introducing incentives to make work in the formal economy easier and more beneficial (e.g. modernising access to social insurance and medical insurance, introducing unemployment benefits, mortgages, etc.)
  • building the social contract between citizens and the government using education and awareness raising initiatives

 

On 21 May, Williams presented his preliminary findings to a conference in Azerbaijan hosted by the Deputy Prime Minister. The conference marked the first visit by a Director General of the ILO to Azerbaijan. The event was also attended by government Ministers from Russia, Belarus, Afghanistan, Turkey, Kazakhstan, Lithuania and Uzbekistan, also interested to discuss how to implement both SDG8 and to formalise their informal economies.

Management School students shortlisted for CIM national marketing award

March 16th, 2018
  • The Chartered Institute of Marketing’s The Pitch competition shortlists top 12 teams
  • £2,500 cash prize available for winners of the competition supported by leading brands, Mintel and Wilkinson Sword

A team of students from the University of Sheffield has been shortlisted for a national marketing award. ‘The Market Ears’ is one of the top twelve teams from across the UK going through to the final round of The Chartered Institute of Marketing (CIM)’s The Pitch competition.

Now in its seventh year, The Pitch sees students from leading universities compete to respond to a live client brief in a bid to win the title of ‘Marketer of the future’. This year, teams were asked to come up with ideas for how Wilkinson Sword’s shaving range can appeal to a younger audience.

Dr Julie Alevizou, Programme Director for International Business Management at the University of Sheffield said: “It is a fantastic achievement for the students to have reached the final shortlist for this national competition. The students have gained valuable experience by responding to a live client brief, and the quality of their work has been recognised by experts in the field.”

International Business Management students, Timothy Vine, Sophie Elton and Charlie Nock, impressed the judges with their response to their brief. The judging panel this year includes marketing experts from Wilkinson Sword, UNILAD, Mintel and CIM.

Gemma Butler, Associate Marketing Director at CIM said: “We’ve been inundated with high-calibre applications this year. It’s been fantastic to get a glimpse of the student talent across
the UK and we’re very much looking forward to seeing the finalists bring their ideas to life in the live final.”

Sarah Wood, Marketing Director at Wilkinson Sword said: “It’s brilliant to receive entries from across UK. The ideas are of such a high calibre and it’s clear a lot of time, effort and creative thinking has gone into responding to our brief. Originality is shining through in each one! We’re grateful to everyone who submitted and wish those shortlisted the best of luck in the final.”

 

Media contact: Mary Hickey, Media and Communications Officer, on 0114 2221034 or email m.o.hickey@sheffield.ac.uk